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Southern Conference on British Studies
Annual Meeting
Charlotte, North Carolina
November 10-11, 2023

 CONFERENCE & HOTEL REGISTRATION INFORMATION & PROGRAM

 

Below is the program and conference and hotel registration information for this year’s Southern Conference on British Studies (SCBS) Annual Meeting. Please join us for a wide-ranging series of panels, a keynote address delivered by Prof. Saheed Aderinto, a joint reception with the European History Section of the Southern Historical Association, and much more. The conference will be held November 10-11, 2023, meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina at the Westin Charlotte. 

 

The SCBS meets in conjunction with the Southern Historical Association (SHA) whose Annual Meeting runs from November 9-12, 2023. SHA attendance typically runs between 1,000 and 1,200 and includes academic historians, editors, museum and public history professionals, K-12 educators, and non-professionals who just love rigorous history. Registered participants for the SCBS Conference can attend SHA panels as well.

 

Registration

SCBS Conference attendees can register for the conference using our online form on the SCBS website, under the “Membership Application” tab ( https://www.scobs.org/membership-application ). Please note that this is a two-step process. After you fill out the form and press the “Submit” button, stay on that same page and scroll down to the bottom, below the “Submit” button, where you will see a “Pay online in our shop” link. Click on that link, and you will be taken to the page where you can make a secure online payment to complete your registration.

 

All presenters are expected to be registered for the conference and current members of the SCBS at the time of the conference. Everyone is strongly encouraged to register for the conference and renew their SCBS membership ahead of time using our website, although onsite registration will also be available at the time of the conference.

 

Headquarters Hotel

The Westin Charlotte, 601 South College Street, Charlotte, NC 28202, will serve as the SCBS / SHA Annual Meeting headquarters for the Charlotte, North Carolina conference. All SHA and SCBS sessions will take place within the hotel.

 

Reservations and Rates

By Phone: (704) 375-2600 (ask for reservations and mention that you are with the SHA)
Online: https://book.passkey.com/go/TheSouthernHistorical2023
SHA and SCBS On-Site Contact: Maja Ferrari (Senior Event Manager; Maja.Ferrari@marriott.com or 704.335.2114)

Single Rate: $179.00

Double Rate: $179.00

Triple Rate: $199.00

Quad Rate: $219.00

Block Cut-Off Date: October 18, 2023

 

Those who do not want to use the online link above (which the hotel prefers) can still call the main reservation number and say you are with the Southern Historical Association.

 

Transportation and Parking

The hotel does not have an airport shuttle. Attendees flying into Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) should plan on a seven mile Uber/Lyft to the hotel. Self-parking is available on-site for $35/night or $40/night for valet parking.

 

Program Drafts for the SCBS and SHA

The full draft program for the SCBS Conference is posted at the bottom of this page. The full draft of the SHA program (which includes all SCBS Panels and events) is posted on the Annual Meeting section of the SHA website ( https://www.thesha.org/meeting ).

 

Hotel Map

All SCBS events will take place in the Kings and Queens Conference Rooms on the second floor of the Westin Charlotte. A map of the second is below, while the full floorplan of the Westin Charlotte can be found in the SHA program here: https://www.thesha.org/assets/docs/2023_SHA_Program_Final.pdf

 

 

 

 

SCBS 2023 Program DRAFT

 

Friday, November 10, 8:15-8:45 – Coffee & Pastries (Kings & Queens) – 30 min.

 

 

Friday, November 10, 8:45-10:30 – 1:45 minute sessions

 

SCBS Room 1 (Kings). Revisiting the American Revolution: Loyalism, Patriotism, and Gender

 

Chair: Jeffrey Hankins, Palo Alto College

 

“In ‘firm attachment to the interest of this Country’: Susannah Marshall and the Consequences of Loyalism in the Revolutionary Era,” Ashley Gilbert, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

“‘Success to Lord Rodney’: Decorative Objects and the Battle of the Saintes, 1782,” Chloe Northrop, Tarrant County College

 

“‘Called it Macaroni’: Towards a Queer British History of the American Revolution,” Charles Upchurch, Florida State University

 

Comment: Stephen J. Stillwell, Jr., Independent Scholar

 

 

SCBS Room 2 (Queens). Colonial and Post-colonial Nigeria

 

Chair: Jill C. Bender, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

“Colonialism, Native Authority and Colonial Administrators in Nigeria: Between Abuse of Power, Selfishness, and Greediness,” Nurudeen Olatoye Arogundade, Osun State University

 

“Unjust hermeneutical practices and girl-child trafficking,” Mary Julius Egbai, University of Calabar 

 

“Religious Echoes from Motor Parks in Lagos State, Nigeria: For God or Bread?,” Ojo Joseph Raphael, Federal University Lokoja

 

Comment: Saheed Aderinto, Florida International University

 

 

Coffee/tea break, 10:30-11:00 (Kings & Queens) – 30 minutes

 

 

Friday, November 10, 11:00-12:45 – 1:45 minute sessions 

 

SCBS Room 1 (Kings). Descriptive Mapping, Communication Networks, and Imperial Power

 

Chair: Andrew Kettler, University of South Carolina at Union

 

“‘A Caske of Ice’: William Taverner’s Survey of Newfoundland,” Helen Shears, Duke University

 

“News of the World and the World According to the News: News Networks in the British Empire, c. 1750-1815,” Troy Bickham, Texas A&M University

 

“The Sea, Distance, and the Challenges of Communication in the Early Steam Era:

The Royal Navy in the Western Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico During the American Civil War,” John Beeler, The University of Alabama

 

Comment: Andrew Kettler, University of South Carolina at Union

 

 

SCBS. Room 2 (Queens). The “Other” at Home: Race, Empire, and Public Perception in Twentieth-Century Britain

 

Chair: Paul Townend, University of North Carolina at Wilmington

 

“‘English-Speaking Foreigners’: British Attitudes toward America before the Great War,” Neal R. McCrillis, University of Illinois Chicago

 

“Narratives of Empire at the Institute of Race Relations in Britain, 1962-1972,” Brett Bebber, Old Dominion University

 

“Britainistan: The (Post)-Colonial Landscape of Homegrown Terrorism,” William Meier, Texas Christian University

 

Comment: Paul Townend, University of North Carolina at Wilmington

 

 

Friday, November 10, 12:45-2:45 – 2 hour lunch / SCBS Executive Council meeting                                                    

 

 

Friday, November 10, 2:45-4:30 – 1:45 minute sessions

 

SCBS Room 1 (Kings). Catholicism, Conformity, and Power

 

Chair: Amanda Allen, High Point University

 

“Satan Next Door: Church Papists and the Limits of Religious Conformity in Early Modern Scotland,” Ryan Burns, Jacksonville State University

 

“Magic, Catholicism, and Irish Missionaries in Eighteenth-Century Scotland,” Cecilia Barnard, Independent Scholar

 

“Transatlantic Catholicism under the Stuarts: The Calverts, Carrolls, and Tactics for Parenting,” Lisa Clark Diller, Southern Adventist University

 

Comment: Amanda Allen, High Point University

 

 

SCBS Room 2 (Queens). Empire: Resistance, Justice, and Remembrance

 

Chair: Michael de Nie, University of West Georgia

 

“The Fenian Threat and Britain’s Colonial Wars,” Jill C. Bender, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

“Thomas Chisholm Anstey and the Elusivity of Imperial Justice,” Paul Townend, University of North Carolina at Wilmington

 

“Conflicted Memories: The Cawnpore Memorial Well at the End of Empire,” David A. Johnson, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Comment: Michael de Nie, University of West Georgia

 

 

Friday 5:30PM – 7:30PM Reception w/ European History Section of the SHA    

                      Mimosa Grill, 237 S Tryon St. (a three-minute walk from the hotel)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday, November 11, 8:15-8:45 – Coffee & Pastries (Kings & Queens) – 30 min.

 

Saturday, November 11, 8:45-10:30 – 1:45 minute sessions

 

SCBS Room 1 (Kings). Judgement, Emotions, and Economics in Seventeenth-Century England

 

Chair: Ryan Burns, Jacksonville State University

 

“Troubling Allurements: Travel, Architecture, and Judgement in Early Modern England,” Aaron White, Mississippi State University

 

“Suicide and Despair in Early Modern England,” Sam Dominy, Georgia State University

 

“Goods, Chattel, and Deodands: Economic Life in the Coroner’s Inquests,” Julie E. Harris, Harding University

 

Comment: Ryan Burns, Jacksonville State University

 

 

SCBS Room 2 (Queens). Transatlantic Discourses on Race, Power, and War

 

Chair: John Beeler, The University of Alabama

 

“Anglo-Saxonism and Pluralism: Twinned Transformations in the Atlantic World,” Tyler Cline, University of Florida

 

“British Civil Warriors: British Transnational Soldiers and the American Civil War,” Andrew Turner, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

“Eugen Sandow, David Lloyd George, and Eugenics: The Utopian Quest for an A1 Empire,” John Fair, University of Texas, Austin

 

Comment: John Beeler, The University of Alabama

 

 

Coffee/tea break, 10:30-10:45 (Kings & Queens) – 15 minute break

 

 

Saturday, November 11, 10:45-12:30 – 1:45 minute sessions

 

SCBS Room 1 (Kings). Conflict, Crime, and Identity Construction in the Press

 

Chair: William Meier, Texas Christian University

 

“The 18th Century Information Age and the Atlantic Creation of Scottish Highlanders,” Richard Austin Lockton, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

“Irish Cartoons and the Land War,” Michael de Nie, University of West Georgia

 

“Satirizing the Fall of 1888: Representations of the ‘Ripper’ murders in Punch,” Mary Purcell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Comment: William Meier, Texas Christian University

 

 

SCBS Room 2 (Queens). Empire, Enclosure, and the Environment in the Atlantic World

 

Chair: Jason White, Appalachian State University

 

“British Florida and the Environment: An Exploration,” Jessica Harland-Jacobs, University of Florida

 

“Cattle, Chattel, and Capital: Tasting Cattle in the Atlantic World,” Andrew Kettler, University of South Carolina at Union

 

“From Displaced to Displacers: Scottish Crofters, First Nation Peoples, and Enclosure of Commons Systems in a Transatlantic Context,” Rachel Herrington, University of Kentucky

 

Comment: Jason White, Appalachian State University

 

 

Lunch Break – 12:30 to 2:30 - 2 hours 

 

 

Saturday, November 12, 2:30-4:15 – 1:45 minute sessions

 

SCBS Room 1 (Kings). Race, Education, and Politics in the Atlantic World

 

Chair: Catherine Molineux, Vanderbilt University

 

“‘Their Prejudices are Deeply Rooted’: White Opposition to Black Literacy in the Colonial Southeast, 1760-1774,” Matthew Blake Strickland, University of Florida

 

“Wilberforce’s Apprentice: Transitions in Antislavery Leadership Revisited,” Richard R. Follett, Covenant College

 

“‘Views of British Honduras’: Seeing Race and Place through the British Imperial Gaze,” Jeffrey Jones, University of Florida

 

Comment: Catherine Molineux, Vanderbilt University

 

 

SCBS Room 2 (Queens). Gender and Female Virtue

 

Chair: Jill C. Bender, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

“‘An Honest Lady Would Have No Need to Paint’: Cosmetics and Sexual Virtue in England’s Long Eighteenth Century,” Ashley Umphenour, University of Texas at Arlington

 

“‘The Journey in Despair’: The Countryside and the Fallen Woman in Adam Bede and Tess of the D’Urbervilles,” Marie Hendry, State College of Florida

 

“Nineteenth Century European Technologies in West Africa: The Intersection of Technology, Trade, Race, Class, and Gender,” Lynda Vernia, University of California, Riverside

 

Comment: Jill C. Bender, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

 

Coffee/tea break, 4:15-4:30 (Kings & Queens) – 15 minute break

 

 

Saturday, November 11, 4:30-5:45

 

Plenary Lecture (Kings)  

 

Introduction: Charles Upchurch, SCBS President, Florida State University

 

 Dr. Saheed Aderinto, Professor of History at Florida International University

“Colonialism and Nature: The British and Their Animal Subjects of Africa”

Professor Saheed Aderinto, Founding President of the Lagos Studies Association, is the author of Animality and Colonial Subjecthood in Africa: The Human and Nonhuman Creatures of Nigeria (Ohio University Press/New African Histories Series, 2022), Guns and Society in Colonial Nigeria: Firearms, Culture, and Public Order (Indiana University Press, January 2018), and When Sex Threatened the State: Illicit Sexuality, Nationalism, and Politics in Colonial Nigeria, 1900-1958 (University of Illinois Press, 2015), which won the 2016 Nigerian Studies Association's Book Award Prize for the “most important scholarly book/work on Nigeria published in English language.”


Saturday, November 11, 5:45-6:45     

                    

Room 1 (Kings): Southern Conference on British Studies membership meeting

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